Episode 21 – Flying Solo – Coding Bootcamps

Episode 21 – Flying Solo – Coding Bootcamps

In this episode, Ricky is flying solo and talks about Coding Bootcamps and a couple higher ups in Ed Tech that share some good strategies for educational technology deployments.

 

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Show Notes & Links:

  1. According to Ed Surge.. Coding Bootcamps Graduates Report 38% Salary BumpThe article explains that 89% of bootcamp students found a new job within 4 months of graduating. With an increase in salary and a high job placement rate Bootcamps are sure to start exploding… some of these bootcamps are now qualifying for federal aid… If you are interested you may also want to know that learning Python is the most lucrative programming language with average salaries after graduating of around 80,000. Hmmm….yeah… that doesn’t sound too bad….
  2. EdScoop features a Q&A with David Rose, the deputy chief of the District of Columbia Public Schools Educational Technology Program. He said blended learning programs at District of Columbia Public Schools are showing gains in achievement and raising student satisfaction. What I found most interesting was his comments on how blended learning has evolved over time. He mentioned that he found there were pockets of individual teachers and schools doing great things with different programs, but there was no dedicated central staff or consistency throughout the district. So they put together a portfolio of programs and software and what grade level it was successful. A very interesting strategy to counteract the search for the magic bullet that will work for districts as a whole or even elementary schools as a whole. He also talks about professional development and device usage… a good Q and A to check out and promote some discussion in your school or district.
  3. In the Huffington Post Education Blog, a story by Ken Eastwood, the Superintendent of Middletown City School District in New York  talks about the success of ed tech is in the pedagogy first… devices come second. He references a recent study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development that found digital device implementation, including computers,  had no positive effect on proficiencies in core areas and in many cases they actually worsened performance. I would say that is a bit scary given the money being spent on this type of technology by school districts across the nation. His solution is to focus on pedagogy, which seems like a no-brainer but oftentimes we get caught up in the new device craze. Here are the steps he recommends…1)When planning edtech inititiatives, ensure the mastery of pedagogy is in place or in the works.2)Contract with third party consultants who can vet the seemingly unlimited digital options to help match your needs.

    3)Know how to generate buy in from schools… one size fits all approach… bad

    4)Finally understand that technology is there to help teachers… make them more efficient and effective. Inspire creativity and not stifle it.

    This is a good read with some important concepts as you develop strategies for your school or district to implement technology.

 

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